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disgusted in a whole parade of traders, and that includes john mccain, lindsey graham, george bush, who has sponsored the center in texas, and i suffered through two hours of propaganda out of the bush center, and they treat america as a whorehouse. stephen moore treats america like a whorehouse. it is not about the money. c-span keeps playing all of these people. i want to see some balance. one thing mentioned at the george bush center from the hispanic chamber of commerce guy, he was lobbing these wonderful hispanic companies. have any of them enrolled in either a five so they will be true to the 1986 amnesty, which, at that point, required all employers verify eligibility by these workers. they have not done it. we have george bush, mccain, they have done nothing but subvert the law for the last 25 years, and they are trying to put the nail in our coffin now. i would like to see more balance from c-span. there was a wonderful march for jobs in washington dc. i have seen none of that on c- span. i would love to see that. jeb, much loved in alabama, he was the speaker of the conference. th
news coming into the "newsroom" right now. this is about former president george w. bush. we have just learned from his office that a blockage was discovered in an artery in his heart and he had a stent placed to open the blockage. in a statement coming from his office, it says that during his annual physical examination, which he gets at the cooper clinic in dallas, and this happened just yesterday, that this blockage was discovered then. his doctors recommended that he go ahead with this process, so it's a stent being placed in the artery it appears to open the blockage. this is a procedure that was performed successfully this morning, without complication, according to this statement, this took place at texas health presbyterian hospital. he is, according to had his office, in high spirits, eager to return home tomorrow. so he's still in the hospital. and resume his normal schedule on thursday. certainly, they are saying here that it does appear to be somewhat normal and he's trying to get back to work here already this week. according to the statement, he is grateful, of course, to
of george w. bush. thank you for the invitation. thunder a little bit when you talk about four percent growth year it i would add to what you said, that i do not think we can accomplish four percent growth without immigration. it is a precondition to get to that higher growth rate. it may be too low. we are in the fourth leader -- year of non-recovery. there is no reason the economy cannot he recovering much faster than it is geared five, six, or seven percent growth. it is interesting, if you look at the time i called the quarter-century of spectacular, unprecedented growth in america, 2005 -- 1980 two 2005 -- to 2005. let in well over 200 americans in that time. badle say immigration is for the economy or it causes high unemployment. the actual evidence shows the opposite, that the biggest boom. of american history was the greatest in immigration. it is circumstantial evidence. a second point is with respect to state. it is so interesting. we do a lot of work at the wall street journal. comparing texas to california, it is a good comparison if you are from texas and believe in the fr
. when george bush involved us and the supposedly illegal wars in iraq and afghanistan, trampling the constitution as we heard incessantly from democrats, he sought and got in the afghan war and in the iraq war a debate in congress and a vote of authorization. and now what we're hearing from the democrats with utter shameless hypocrisy, this administration is not required to do it. look, the main question that boehner was asking is, is all of this to send a message, to which i would say if you want to send a message, call western union. you don't use tomahawk missiles and engage in war. war is a serious thing. that's why it should be debated in the congress. >> the bush administration also had a united nations resolution as well. juan? >> i think it is very important to say for all of the verbiage we just saw from speaker boehner, speaker boehner, you know, senate majority reid, neither is calling for vote or asking for this to happen. all that you read off, there was no request for speaker boehner for an actual vote. if you can imagine a debate in congress over u.s. military acti
believe the economy was so messed up by george bush that obama struggled mightily to overcome this horrible situation he inherited. the second reason is most americans believe republicans only care about rich people. and those are branding problems that the republican party has to to overcome. and it's hard to overcome it because you've got three obstacles; academia, hollywood and our major media, all of which are overwhelmingly liberal. when you say something, it's got to be interpreted through the filter of those three entities, and often it's been distorted. >> host: larry elder is our guest, this is booktv on c-span2 live from the los angeles times festival of books, campus of usc. mike's in fort worth, texas. hi, mike. >> caller: how's it going, larry? my -- pretty good. i'm a african-american democrat, but i agree with you one of the big problems in the african-american community is lack of fathers in the house. but i think, larry, when you say that, you kind of come off kind of harsh on black people. now, what's the reason behind the lack of a lot of fathers being in th
for the george bush administration to protect us from the terrorists. createdthe scandal they by the republicans so they can take points from the democrats won the elections come. from twitter says what is needed is a clear personal data law. kirk is up next from pittsburgh, pennsylvania. on the democrats line -- caller: good morning. would 100% advocate for this nsa program and others like it, if only they would truly concentrate on the real terrorist. this is to belittle what occurred on 9/11 or happened at the boston marathon, but there are tens of thousands of americans that die every year. tot is due to corporate ceos pollute our rivers and streams and even our ocean. did in the gulf of mexico, and here in pennsylvania we have more super clean up sites. the name ofdone in greed versus gluttony. relate that to the surveillance program. survey these corporations, who are murdering tens of thousands of people , get the goods on them, arrest them, try them, and sentence them or execute him for the crimes they are committee. host: will from columbia, tennessee. caller: good morning. thank you c-
collar. caller: do you know the reasoning kind why george bush -- behind why george bush wanted to sell our ports? not know you member this. i think he is referring to 2004, the dubai company wanted to buy a port in the united states. guest: i certainly remember that. guest: we believe in privatizing the ports here. i think in the full length of time i decided to keep the state owned. host: what does that mean? i believe wasler referring to when there was discussion here locally about actually selling the port to a .oreign company that came to a full halt. i thought that was the right thing at the time. host: what does this mean to you that this is a state owned entity? guest: it is run and the public good. if it is privately own you have to maximize short-term profit. with government owned we can look at the long-term benefits to the commonwealth of virginia. that is why i am delighted that we do not sell it. we have to consider all of this. the fact that it is now still in control the commonwealth and use for the public good, that makes a good. host: is this port sustained by revenues
of texas does recently because of the leadership though shown by george w. bush, is that when you look at states like arizona, not typical in arizona, but i was just thinking alabama, arkansas' next. if you look at arizona, if memory serves arizona export something like $50 billion a year. if you look at texas can we export $206 billion a year. 35% of those exports go directly to mexico. i think george w. bush understood the tenuous but important relationship that has to exist with our neighbors to the south. i think he was very strategic and smart in building and growing and fostering a relationship over time. and today, texas is benefiting from his leadership back then. a large proportion of the hispanic owned firms in this state and minority owned firms in the state are actually owned by mexican nationals. and so this didn't happen by accident. it happened because very strategic visionary leadership happened two, three decades or a decade ago. now we are benefiting from the. >> creating an environment. >> absolutely. doesn't happen overnight. now you see other states beginning to re
on their taxes. >> up next, george w. bush institute resale the series of discussions looking at immigrants contributions for america. this panel focuses on the economic effects of naturalization. from dallas, this is about one hour. >> a pleasure to be here. i worked for closed with president bush when he was in the white house trying to advance immigration reform in the last battle and so it's a pleasure for me to be back in his beautiful new house, talking about immigration. so thank you to this institute. i want to harken back as we get started to the ceremony that we saw this morning combat incredible moving ceremony because what we're going to talk about here today is not just out immigration is good for america, but have naturalization and citizenship actually even ups the ante and makes immigrants even more beneficial for the united states. to benefit themselves, but it's also a benefit for the country. so the very people we saw this morning when they came in the door, they were great for america but as they went out the door their even more. they will be even more of an asset. we w
baker had with george bush because -- i don't know exactly the reason, but i said, for example, the other day, the national security adviser went to moscow to meet with the russian president has started arranging a relationship. if i was secretary of state would not have tolerated that. that is my job. and as national security adviser , you're a staff person, not a principle. i remember when general powell got the role. he understood. he came around to me and said, i am a member of your staff. obviously the president is my main guy, but my job is to staff the council. and so i think that is beginning to get out of kilter. in my book have quite a lot to say about the structural governance and how it is going, i think, in the wrong direction. >> host: secretary george shultz, a couple more issues on your mind. number one, demographics. you're worried about demographics. >> guest: i'm not worried. an observant. i see that the demographics of the world had changed and are continuing to change rapidly. the developed countries basically have no fertility. they are getting to be older
for. george w. bush had done that i think he would've been, we would've been heard cries of impeachment. we had part of our immigration laws suspended by the president. there's just a variety of issues like that where he has gone outside. we have tension with our system, struggles between congress and the president. this one is very -- i think you'll see it continue. but there will be legal cases. >> i'm going to try to bounce around a little bit but again we will get to everybody. >> i was a little concerned to find that you were not in support of making the continuing resolution contingent upon removing what optional spending you move on obamacare. i feel very strongly. i speak from a point of view -- [applause] >> i think they do, too. >> this is not theoretical for me because two weeks ago today my husband and i paid in cash for our son to have major surgery. but, you know, what? that's the price i paid for the liberty of my children. i'm self-employed. i understand the consequent of that as i've limited options thanks our government on insurance. i understand that i
, not everybody, but a lot of people would agree that president bush, george w. bush, was obligated to strike back against al qaeda after september 11, 2001. we were attacked, and we had to respond. and i think that most people would say that president obama the very right to launch azeinab badawi race that killed osama bin laden. history and diplomacy co-exist. they interact with each other and they sometimes can complement each other. richard holbrooke, the late richard holbrooke, great american diplomat, i don't think he would have been able to secure the peace in bosnia had we not used force for six weeks to demonstrate to the bosnian-serb army that we were not going to permit them to continue to kill innocent muslims. and it was that use of force that achieved the cease-fire and drove them to the negotiating table where holbrook worked his magic and brought peace to bosnia after five years of war. so there are times when we have to rely on our military and we're fortunate, as all of you know, to have extraordinary young men and women in our military and the army and the navy and the air force
is related to the polks and she used their dinner service while her and george bush was in the office. is that true? >> i don't know. good question. >> as our series progresses, as we get it barbara bush, we'll answer that question for you. we'll go back in time and learn about how that political partnership came together. you told us sarah polk was from a wealthy family in tennessee. how did she and james polk meet? >> they ran in the same circles. probably through -- either through andrew jackson or through her own father's family. polk went to the -- graduated from the university of north carolina and then went into law and studied in nashville and became clerk of the legislature and they met there or they met at andrew jackson's because the polk girls were often at the jackson's home. certainly jackson is known or we think that he advised polk to marry her. this is who you need as a wife, he would say. and then it is commonly said that she told polk she wouldn't marry him unless he ran for office but and of course he did and he won and they were married in 1824. >> so andrew jacks
military force to respond to syria's alleged chemical weapons use, it would be an echo of what george w. bush did ten years ago when our government said it was sure, but it was wrong, and the resulting war without u.n. approval was one of america's greatest foreign policy mistakes ever, if not the greatest foreign policy mistake ever. so now here we are. the drum beat in washington today says that there is going to be an american or an american and allied military hit of some kind against sere wra. what will that do? what choices does president obama have in terms of how to respond if we does want to respond militarily or otherwise? does congress get a say in the matter? and what happens if we are wrong about this? our government's track record on being wrong about chemical weapons is long. it spans multiple administrations for multiple reasons. if the use of chemical weapons really is going to be a real redline in the world that demands a response when it happens, why is the world waiting for our government to make up our government's own mind about whether this happened? instead of wa
it with karl rove. he served as deputy chief of staff and senior advisor to president george w. bush. he is a fox news contributor. karl, welcome. that spot tells the story of a family in north carolina who received an insurance rebate because of obamacare. what do you think about promoting the president's health care law based on that kind of a, you know, monetary rebate? >> well, it's not going to do too well for a reason very few people are getting those rebates. those rebates are a part of the,#: affordable care act called the medical loss ratio. this provision basicallyally says insurance companies have to take 85% or more of the premium income they receive and pay it out for medical bills. if you don't pay out at least 85% of the premium income for medical bills, then you have to give a rebate to everybody that, is a policyholder. now according to the centers for medicare & medicaid services at the department of health and human services, last year, we're talking about rebates gone out for last year, that was the reference in the tv ad, 2.7% of americans are getting a rebate. so on
chief of staff to president george w. bush and a fox news contributor with us from his home in austin, texas. you wrote a piece in the wall street journal, i know you've got a white board, too, so i'll get you to explain it. you call it the un affordable careless act. actually, that was a great line by the headline writer, but my piece was about the unintended consequences of the bill. president obama never sold the affordable care act to the american people by saying, look, this is going to create more part-time jobs in the place of full-time jobs, and yet that's one of big consequences of the bill. if you take a look at it, under the affordable care act a full-time worker is defined as somebody who works as 30 hours or more a a week, and if you work 30 hours or more a week, your employer has to provide you with health insurance coverage. now, this encourages a disincentive to employ people over 30 hours. the number of people who are working 30-34 hours a week has dropped 146,500 on average a month. the number of people working 25-29 hours a week has risen 119,000 on average per mont
hardly ever come up. they were attacking dick cheney, attacking george bush with, attacking the fbi and others, nsa had pretty much been unscathed in all this. the only time it really came up as a matter of debate in the intelligence committee was people from the nsa coming forward and saying what a rough time they were having with the fisa court, how hard it was for them to get court orders, how hard it was to be able to follow up on the information they were getting. this is not a rubber stamp. this is constantly scrutinized. it's also scrutinized by the house and senate intelligence committees. i worry saying congress is keeping an eye on it for you isn't exactly a vote of confidence. but, seriously, people on the intelligence committee take it very seriously. i can tell you that this stuff is looked at very, very carefully. so i think we have to keep all of this in mind. i don't see any significant violation of civil liberties. i don't see any significant -- to me, if we have a balanced thought like with zazi in 2009, zazi, and this is one of those forest gump moments where you
dakota, republican collar. caller: do you know the reasoning kind why george bush wanted to -- behind why george bush wanted to sell our ports? host: i do not know you member this. i think he is referring to 2004, the dubai company wanted to buy a port in the united states. guest: i certainly remember that. guest: we believe in privatizing the ports here. i think in the full length of time i decided to keep the state owned. host: what does that mean? guest: the caller i believe was referring to when there was discussion here locally about actually selling the port to a foreign company. that came to a full halt. i thought that was the right thing at the time. you: what does this mean to that this is a state owned entity? guest: it is run and the public good. if it is privately own you have to maximize short-term profit. with government owned we can look at the long-term benefits to the commonwealth of virginia. that is why i am delighted that we do not sell it. we have to consider all of this. the fact that it is now still in control the commonwealth and use for the public good, that makes
in the state before the 2008 sweepstakes. we are 23 months earlier than george w. bush's first visit in june of 1999. bill: why is it this early? >> i have a theory. the political system makes a judgment as to when you are going to turn a page on the pathr president in his second term. the sooner i start to turn that page the more that activity ramps up. we have joe biden who will focus on his 2016 hopes. the senator from minnesota is going to make an appearance in the state. i'm thinking the political system is starting to say, president obama, you are in our second term and you are going to become a lame duck and it looks like it will bener than later. president bush's approval ratings in 2005 were slightly above were president obama's are today. but he was engaged in the system and the system was moving. the congress had passed thus far in 2005, a trade agreement with central america, the first energy policy bill in decade, a multi-year highway bill. it was the last time the president and the congress had a multi-year funding bill. bill: you are argue he was active and relevant. >> you me
that both in terms of his experience here at the george george bush institute but more partly in terms of his experience as an army officer. >> thank you robert payday would like to start out by wishing congratulations to our newest citizens. my experience over the past 24 years as active military service has been in our our most engage service-oriented and patriotic citizens and servicemembers are our newest. and so as the director of the military service initiatives here i had the honor and responsibility to lead the bush institute's effort to honor the service and sacrifice of all of their post-9/11 veterans military servicemembers and their families but also to empower and unite the efforts of non-profits businesses universities individual citizens and communities to improve the well-being of those veteran servicemembers and their families but also to release their potential to continue to serve as national assets in their communities after their military service is over. and so since september 11, 2001, 2.3 million members of this country have gone -- worn the uniform in iraq or a
there were uncontrolled bureaucracies under george bush. it goes back to the thing we kind of started out with. the federal government is out of control. but it has been predicted by all of the historians that the republic would fail. the question is, how do we teach history, go back, every embrace the thing that made america great? and as i said earlier, i think we have to get in charge. i have been working for nine years to try to make a big difference. i have made a small difference. i worked every day trying to do things. i am convinced the only way we do that is half the state start exerting their temporary authority and reassessing -- [applause] -- changes to the constitution that restore federalism in the constitution. and so i think that is the way. you are frustrated. you want to see me in washington. asked my staff. as my wife. i want to pull my hair out. you know, i see two things. i see the constitution, and see what is happening to it. then i see grown men and women who know what the constitution says you don't care. that is what really makes me want to pull my hair out. they
't the same kind of relationships that i had with president nixon that, say, jim baker had with george bush. because i don't know exactly the reason. but i saw, for example, the other day that the national security adviser went to moscow to meet with putin and started ranging that relationship. if i was secretary of state, i would not tolerate that. that's my job. and the national security adviser's a staff person, not a principal. i remember when colin powell got the job of secretary of national security adviser, he understood. and he came around to me, and he said i'm a member of your staff. obviously, the president's my main guide, but with my job is to staff the could be is ill. the council. and so i think that's beginning to get out of kilter, and in my book i have quite a lot to say about the structure of governance and how it's going, i think, in the wrong direction. >> host: secretary schultz, a couple more issues on your mind. number one, demographics. you're worried about demographics. >> guest: oh, i'm not worried about it, i'm observant of it. i see that the demographics of the
's an attorney. he worked in several capacities when george w. bush was the founder of texas. the halon affiliation and they were delighted that stuart bowen has developed such innovative and attractive materials to understand. i think it really is held that there's a lot of visual presentation of lessons and iraq and the very complicated story of funding what didn't work very well. and how we can do betterh next te. we have invited stuart bowen to meet his presentations first. we will then turn to jim schear, who has recently finished his second tour of the pentagon as an assistant secretary for responsibility for stability operations in his earlier career he was a research scholar at the national defense university, director of research there and worked throughout his career on these questions of stabilization and reconstruction including at the u.n. and some of its early post of war success stories in cambodia, the balkans and elsewhere. so how did stuart bowen ideas, what kind of responses were there more broadly in the pentagon and the interagency community and his own reflections
the administration you work for and what you're responsible for. >> so i served under both terms of the george w. bush administration. was actually appointed by the transportation secretary norman mineta. as you may know, mr. mineta is a democrat served in the republican administration and r authoring and then congress passed a reorganization act that led to the creation of this agency. and this agency at the u.s. d.o.t. oversees a million daily shipments of has does materials by all modes of transportation, air, land, truck, sea, vessel. and even pipeline. >> so your current work with united transportation advisers, what is that? >> a consulting firm. i'm a lawyer, have a law practice and consulting practice. so we talk infrastructure projects, we talk transportation projects to both public and private sector clients. >> so one of y clients key stone xl? not. >> anybody supporting nosir. >> so as far as key stone xl is concerned, the position that you are taking through the advisers or anyone else, where do you stand on it or if it should be built? >> i've been monitoring this for several years
shoot our church? they appealed to president george h.w. bush at the time. they appealed to the u.n. someone to stop the slaughter. they will march to this treats free tracing the steps of the funeral two weeks before. some putting their hands up in the thee sign shouting viva sebastian. thousands from work school and home and they march to the santa cruz cemetery. when we got there we were interviewing people. why are you risking your life to do this and they would say for my mother, for my father, for my village that was wiped out and from the direction the procession had come we saw hundreds of indignation soldiers carrying their u.s. m-16s in the ready position marching up to the crowd. 90% of the weapons used were from the united states. the indonesian army was arms trained and financed by the united states and on this day was no different. the soldiers marched 10 to 12 abreast. allen and i were interviewing people in the middle of the crowd and allen suggested we walk to the front of the crowd. we knew the indonesian military had committed many massacres they had never done
passed fewer executive orders at this point in his presidenciy than did george w. bush or bill clinton. people are always annoyed when presidents act with executive orders. aren't they? but presidents do it. it is their prerogative. and that's what his predecessors did even more than he did. >> it's not the number. >> you did when you were president. >> did i executive orders when i was governor. i never bypassed the law. i didn't do things that i knew i could not do under the constitution of my state. what i think is different is not how many it's what they do. executive order that says we are going to order federal employees to, you know, to work through their lunch hour for six months. okay, that's not a constitutional issue. a federal executive order where the president says we're going to let people come into the country even though though don't have documentation and even though the law doesn't permit it, that's a violation. >> alisyn: the dream act doesn't say that what he did with the dream act kids brought here through no fault of their own. >> i agree with the dream act's goa
on the others i think it's a war. medal was approved by congress, not a dime ever voted for it. had george w. bush had done that i think we would have heard cries of impeachment. we are part of our immigration laws, and i was suspended by the president when the year before he said he couldn't do that. there's just a variety of issues like that when he's gone outside. we have to tension with our system, struggles between congress and the president, but this one is very cities. you will see it continue. but there will be legal cases. all the way back. i'm going to try to bounce around all of it. it begin, we will get to everybody. >> i was a little concerned to find that you are not in support of making the continuing resolution contingent upon removing what optional spending you can remove on obamacare. i feel very strongly. i think the other speaker i speak from my point of view -- applaud not this is not theoretical because two weeks ago today my husband and i paid in cash for our son to have major surgery. a four-hour procedure. that's the price i pay for the liberty of my children. i'm se
for and what you were responsible for. >> guest: i served under but george w. bush administration and was appointed by the transportation secretary norman. and as you may know, he is a democrat who served in the republican administration and he was responsible for offering and then congress passed a reorganization act that led to the creation of this agency. and this agency fmsa receives a million daily shipments of hazardous air, land, truck, and sea, dessel and pipeline. >> host: you're current work with the national transportation advisers, what is that? >> guest: i am a lawyer by training and we also have a consulting practice. so, we talk infrastructure projects, transportation projects to both public and private sector clients. >> host: is one of your clients keystone xl? is anybody supporting trans canada? >> guest: no, sir. >> host: as far as keystone xl is concerned, the decision that you were taking, where do you stand if it shouldn't be built on the extension we've been talking about? >> guest: i've been monitoring this for several years. when i was at the d.o.t. the or
, and that is former president george h.w. bush. i've had, i had a chance to work with him, incredible leader, an incredible human being who has given so much back to the community. as president of the united states, but as former president of the united states. so i am honored to stand in for him today. he apologizes, but -- [laughter] we've been talking a lot about work force and whether we have the right people in lace to provide the services -- in place to provide the services. you're the front line. you're the absolute front line. and for people to be able to get quality, affordable health care, they have to be able to come through that door and be accepted and have confidence that they're going to be treated with the care that they expect. and you have provided that. and you have done that as a volunteer. which is just remarkable from the point of view of if we could clone you and have you throughout -- [laughter] it would make life a lot easier. we've talked a lot also about how do you get people into the system, and you personally have gotten people into the system because of the mann
to speak at the bush institute i leapt at the opportunities a way of such an admirer of george w. bush. you stole my fender a little bit talking about 4% growth but i don't think we can accomplish i think it is a precondition but the only way that i have a problem with that is that we could do that of the fourth year of the non recovery there is no reason it cannot be growing much faster than it is even a five or six or 7 percent growth this is interesting if you look at the period of a quarter-century unprecedented growth that was a period when we have the average of almost 4 percent growth over the same time period unprecedented immigration well over 12 lead americans and people say that it would depress rage wages but the actual evidence shows the opposite the biggest boom was also the biggest immigration that doesn't mean they caused it but it is substantial evidence. the second point is with respect to states, at the "wall street journal" the least 10 it editorials comparing california and texas, it is good. >> those moving from california to texas. so what you have seen over the last
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